Herbopathy-induced cephalgia: Remedy gone wrong

  • Ashima Mittal Department of Internal Medicine, Saint Peter's University Hospital, New Brunswick, New Jersey, United States https://orcid.org/0000-0001-9654-4966
  • Alessandro Iliceto Internal Medicine, Saint Peter's University Hospital, New Brunswick, New Jersey, United States
  • Balaji Yegenswaran Internal Medicine, Saint Peter's University Hospital, New Brunswick, New Jersey, United States
Keywords: Cimicifuga, Headache, Herbal

Abstract

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Author Biography

Alessandro Iliceto, Internal Medicine, Saint Peter's University Hospital, New Brunswick, New Jersey, United States

Resident, PGY-1, Internal Medicine

References

1. Borrelli F, Ernst E. Black cohosh (Cimicifuga racemosa): A systematic review of adverse events. Am J Obstet Gynecol 2008; 199(5): 455-66.
2. Gardner Z, McGuffin M. American Herbal Products Association's botanical safety handbook. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press; 2013.
3. Geller SE, Shulman LP, van Breemen RB, Banuvar S, Zhou Y, Epstein G, et al. Safety and efficacy of black cohosh and red clover for the management of vasomotor symptoms: A randomized controlled trial. Menopause 2009; 16(6): 1156-66.
4. Burdette JE, Liu J, Chen SN, Fabricant DS, Piersen CE, Barker EL, et al. Black cohosh acts as a mixed competitive ligand and partial agonist of the serotonin receptor. J Agric Food Chem 2003; 51(19): 5661-70.
5. Zimmermann R, Witte A, Voll RE, Strobel J, Frieser M. Coagulation activation and fluid retention associated with the use of black cohosh: a case study. Climacteric 2010; 13(2): 187-91.
Published
2019-06-13
How to Cite
1.
Mittal A, Iliceto A, Yegenswaran B. Herbopathy-induced cephalgia: Remedy gone wrong. Iran J Neurol. 18(3):148-149.
Section
Letter(s) to the Editor